Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Board seeks to boost book budget

The Fauquier County Public Library board of trustees voted unanimously at its November meeting to increase the daily fine for overdue materials to 15 cents per day, effective January 1, 2010. This marks the first change in the library’s charge for overdue books since 1989.

The board took the action to partially offset the $93,000 drop in fiscal year 2010 funding for purchasing new books and other materials. Fines collected will be directly applied to the materials budget.
Raising revenue from fines is just one way the board hopes to boost the materials budget. The library board is also soliciting donations for periodicals and other items and continuing the course set in 2009 for seeking partnerships with businesses and community organizations.

In 2009 the Warrenton Rotary Club agreed to contribute $2,500 to support a world geography book series for children and other library programs. In August, Borders Books in Warrenton made the library one of the recipients of its monthly book drive. More than 500 books on the library’s “to buy” list were bought by Borders customers to be donated to the library.

Individuals can help support the library too. Monetary gifts, bequests, and memorial or honorary contributions are always welcome, and now there are other ways to donate. Once easy way to do so is through the library’s Amazon Wish List.

Another way to fund the book budget — and it costs you nothing — is to start your Amazon.com shopping by going this site. Amazon will donate a percentage of your purchases to the library and they won’t charge you any more for ordering via the Wowbrary link. This is a great and simple way to support the library, and you can do this year-round. Call (540) 349-1928 or e-mail if you have questions about donations.

Libraries across the nation began reporting increased usage as the economy worsened, and Fauquier County Public Library is seeing this trend too.

During the first half of 2009, circulation of materials increased by 17 percent, visits to the library increased by 16 percent and program attendance grew by 8 percent. Participation in the 2009 summer reading programs topped any previous year and more than 74,000 Internet sessions were logged onto Fauquier libraries’ public access computers as patrons did research, conducted job searches, and filled out online employment applications.

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Join a book club in 2010

Along with some of the most common new year resolutions - spending more time with loved ones, losing weight and becoming more fit - many people also vow to learn something new and/or enjoy themselves more.

It's understandable that as the new year starts many people decide to explore the latter two options by joining a book discussion group. Millions of people participate in book clubs and reading groups in the United States. Some estimates place the number at well over 5 million.

The reasons for joining a book discussion group are as varied as the members themselves. Some join groups to expand their horizons or to feel like they are part of the community. Some love the intellectual stimulation while others find it's a rewarding way to stay in touch with trends or to be reminded of core values.

Whatever the reasons, participating in book discussion groups enriches our lives.

Fauquier County Public Library has several book clubs, so why not make a New Year resolution to treat yourself and drop in on a few meetings. See The Readers Corner.

Friday, December 18, 2009

Know an adult needing help using the Internet?


Fauquier County Public Library provides a series of free classes for adults on basic Internet skills that repeats each month. Topics included: e-mail for beginners, advanced e-mail, searching the Web, and tips and tricks. Classes are definitely "user-friendly."

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Give to your community through the library

Giving to the Fauquier County Public Library is a wonderful way to benefit people in your community, and your donation continues to benefit for years to come.

The library provides free access to books and other materials, as well as online resources, to everyone equally, and your gift enriches someone's life with each check-out or inhouse use.

Monetary gifts, bequests, and memorial or honorary contributions are always welcome at the library, but these are only a few of the ways you can remember the library as you check off your gift list this season.

If you would like to donate new books to the library, an easy way to do so is through the library’s Amazon Wish List for children and adults. Place your order today for the library to receive its gifts from you by Christmas.

Another great way to support the library, and it costs you nothing, is to start your Amazon.com shopping by to Amazon's Wowbrary. Amazon will donate a percentage of your purchases to the library and they won’t charge you anything extra. This is a simple and fun way to support the library, and you can do this year-round, not just during the holidays.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Plan first, then celebrate the holidays stress free

The holidays can be a stressful time, but a visit to the library can help you manage it. Not only is the library a great place to locate numerous resources for planning and managing this busy time, but it is a wonderful oasis for enjoying some of the simpler joys of the season.
First, organize your time. Fauquier County Public Library has holiday books, music CDs, cook books and guides for entertaining and decorating that will help you plan the season’s gift-giving, decorating, cooking, and music. If you are traveling, a stop at the library to check out books on tape or CD prior to leaving will make your road trip or airport waits more enjoyable. See this list of Family Listening favorites.

The library is also offering a service that could take the worry out of some of your holiday shopping. Staff members have prepared lists of current best-selling books ideal for purchasing as gifts this holiday season. The lists feature titles for children, teens, and adults. Ask for a copy of the list at any library location.

If you do decide to purchase books for loved ones, or if you're ordering anything online from Amazon.com, consider starting your online shopping using this Amazon link. If you do, Amazon will donate a percentage of your purchases to the library at no extra charge to you. It is a simple way to support the library, and you can use this link year-round, not just during the holidays.

The most important part of the season is celebrating with family and friends and most people appreciate traditional events held right in their own communities. All Fauquier libraries have special events planned for their communities this year.

Warrenton Library staff will be offering free cocoa and cookies at the library's Winchester Street entrance during Olde Town Warrenton’s Main Street Christmas parade again this year. Everyone is invited to stop by the library from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, for this perfect winter pick-me-up.

After the parade, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., families can visit the library’s children’s section to make a Christmas craft. The refreshments and the crafts materials are free; registration is not required. Call (540) 349-1128 for more details about the crafts.

The Bealeton Library will host the lighting of the community Christmas tree, which resides in front of the library year-round, though, admittedly, in less regal trappings most of the time. Join the festive caroling beginning at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 7, then stay for the tree lighting around 7 p.m. Families are then invited to stick around and hear holiday stories while waiting for Santa and Mrs. Claus to arrive.

Santa and Mrs. Claus will also visit the other Fauquier libraries: 4:30 p.m. Tues., Dec. 8, at the John Marshall Library and 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 14, at the Warrenton Library. Seeing Santa at the library sure beats trying to get a glimpse of the old guy at a crowded mall, and you get the bonus of seeing Mrs. Claus.

The Bealeton Library is also hosting an open house after the Bealeton community Christmas parade on Saturday, Dec. 12. The parade starts around noon, and afterward everyone is invited to stop by to enjoy refreshments and an awards ceremony. Children and their families are invited to participate in a post-parade Christmas craft program, too. (Call 540-439-9301 for more details on the parade.)

The Friends of the Fauquier Library, a nonprofit organization supporting the library, is sponsoring all the library’s holiday events. Proceeds from the Friends member ship dues and from the Book Cellar, a used book store with fiction and nonfiction for all ages, benefit the library making programs such as these possible.

The Book Cellar is a great place to shop for stocking stuffers and inexpensive last-minute gifts that “keep on giving.” There are weekly specials and a special Christmas section will be featured throughout the season. Don’t miss the large selection of coffee table books on a variety of topics, popular authors in hardback, travel-ready paperbacks, movies on VHS and DVD, music CDs, and much more.

Once you've gotten all your errands done, settle down with a selection from the Christmas Reads for adults list available at all Fauquier libraries.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Bealeton depot renovations on track

Long-awaited renovations to the Bealeton depot will finally begin in November, 2009. Fauquier County received notification in October 2009 that construction could begin on the Bealeton Station depot, part of Fauquier County Public Library, Bealeton Library complex. Once completed, the depot will be used as a library program room and community meeting space.



Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Huge book sale to benefit library

The Friends of the Fauquier Library is hosting a two-story book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 13 and 14, at the John Barton Payne Building.
Prices for hardcover books and oversized paperbacks will start at 50 cents, regular paperbacks will be sold for 25 cents each or five for a $1, and music albums and cassettes will be priced for as little as 10 cents.
The Friends Book Cellar, which is considered by some as Warrenton’s best kept secret, will also be open during its regular store hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. The Book Cellar is located in the basement of the John Barton Payne Building.
The library accepts gifts of new and used books in good condition, audio recordings, DVDs and similar materials. Items not added to the library’s collection are given to the Book Cellar, which continually restocks its shelves with bargains. If you have more than one box of items to donate, please make arrangements in advance by call (540) 349-1928.
Currently, anyone joining the Friends or renewing their membership will receive a coupon for a tote bag redeemable at The Book Cellar or at any Fauquier library. Membership forms are available at all Fauquier libraries and at the Book Cellar. Call (540) 439-1939 for more information about the Friends or to volunteer in the Book Cellar.

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Two genealogy programs coming up

Family research marathon hosted by library
The library will host a family research marathon from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6, at the Warrenton Library. Librarians and researchers will be available to help participants research their family histories, and light refreshments, provided by Friends of the Fauquier Library, will help marathon participants keep their strength up.

The marathon is free, but advanced registration is required and registrants must be 18 or older. Call (540) 347-8750, ext. 6, to register. The library’s online databases, including HeritageQuest and Ancestry Library Edition from Ancestry.com , will be used by marathon participants.

Ancestry Library Edition, only available for use in the library, provides a wide range of resources for genealogical and historical research. It includes records from the U.S. Census, military records, court, land and probate records, vital and church records, directories, petitions for naturalization; passenger lists and more. Ancestry Library Edition is only available in the library.

Beginning genealogy research workshop slated
Those beginning or about to begin family history research or those just curious about genealogy can learn basic research steps and get information on recommended Web sites and other information sources during a free workshop at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 14, at the Bealeton Library. The workshop includes an introduction to online databases, including those mentioned above.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Good 'Friends" appreciated

This month Fauquier County Public Library is honoring the Friends of the Fauquier Library, a nonprofit organization that provides funding for library services, equipment and programs for children, teens and adults, by highlighting the group’s many contributions.

Friends donations expand and enrich the library's regular budget by helping provide programs, training and equipment that would not be possible to fund otherwise. The summer reading programs for children and teens; Wii equipment and games used by all ages, including seniors; children’s room furniture; and staff development support are just a few examples of how Friends donations help the library.

“I don’t know where we would be without the Friends,” says Library Director Maria Del Rosso. “They helped sponsor hundreds of library programs every year that would not have been possible through funds normally available for library operations. I think most patrons would be surprised to learn how many of the services and programs they enjoy are supported by the Friends.”

Friends donations are raised primarily through membership dues — which start at $15 — and proceeds from the Book Cellar, a used book store in Old Town Warrenton.

Book Cellar volunteers, most of whom are Friends members, are crucial to the operations and vitality of the Friends of the Fauquier Library, but there are rewards for volunteers, too.
“The library has always played such an important role in my life and in my family’s life,” said Friends president Tina Ross. “I truly enjoy being able to give something back – and being an active member of this group is fun!”

Currently, anyone joining the Friends or renewing their membership will receive a coupon for an attractive, heavy duty tote bag bearing the Friends logo. Coupons are redeemable and membership forms are available at all Fauquier libraries and at the Book Cellar. Call (540) 439-1939 for more information about the Friends or to volunteer in the Book Cellar.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Teens celebrate Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead, El Día de los Muertos, is a festival traditionally celebrated in Mexico and other Latin American countries in November.

Teens are invited to get crafty, Latino-style, to decorate calaveras de azúcar (sugar skulls), make papel picado (cut paper banners) and play Lotería (Mexican bingo) on Tuesday, Nov. 3, at two Fauquier libraries.

The free event is open to students in sixth grade and up.

Registration is required. Call the library by Oct. 31 to reserve your spot.

See more teen events and teen services at the library. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Fauquier Library.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Ghosts of Fauquier outed

The author of the popular Ghosts of Virginia series, L.B. Taylor, will talk about accounts of spectral visits in Fauquier County, the Shenandoah Valley and northern Virginia during a free event hosted by the Bealeton Library at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24.

Mr. Taylor’s research for the 1983 book Haunted Houses, stimulated his research into psychic phenomena and led to the publication of 21 Virginia ghost books, including Civil War Ghosts of Virginia, The Ghosts of Fredericksburg, The Ghosts of Williamsburg, A Treasury of True Ghostly Humor and the 13 volumes, to date, in the Ghosts of Virginia series. He has authored more than 300 national magazine articles and more than 40 nonfiction books.

Mr. Taylor will answer questions and sign copies of his books after the program. Call (540) 439-9728 for more information.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Save energy, save money

Dominion Virginia Power representatives are presenting free workshops designed to help people learn no-cost and low-cost ways to conserve energy and lower energy bills this month. The workshops, hosted by two Fauquier libraries, will include the use of an online calculator to perform do-it-yourself energy audits.

The Bealeton Library will host the workshop from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10. The workshop will be repeated at the John Barton Payne Building from 10:30 a.m. to noon Thursday, Oct. 22.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Find potential funders for your nonprofit

The Bealeton Library is hosting a free workshop to help nonprofits find potential funders for their organizations. The one-hour workshop, slated for 9 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7, will teach participants how to effectively use Foundation Directory Online, a powerful resource available at the library.

Foundation Directory Online is part of a collection of resources from The Foundation Center of New York, the nation's leading authority on organized philanthropy that identifies funding sources. The Bealeton Library is the only branch in the Fauquier County Public Library system where the collection is available.

Registration is required for the workshop. Call or e-mail Natalie Swart, (540) 439-9728 to make your reservation.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Warrenton Library garden


Warrenton Library garden
Originally uploaded by fauquierlibrary

The Warrenton Library garden is a beautiful place to read or just have some quiet time. The garden is maintained by the Cedar Run Garden Club.

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Lecture promises insight on lesser known Confederate "heroes"

Military historian and award-winning author of The Hunt for Confederate Gold Thomas Moore will lecture on what he terms are the “lesser known heros of the Confederacy” this weekend. The lecture, entitled Lesser Known Heroes of the Confederacy: Pelham, Pegram and Pendleton: The Gallant Young Men of the Confederacy will begin at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 20 at the John Barton Payne Building.

Moore was a leader in Washington's defense and international security community and an expert consultant to the firearms industry. He served two years in the Pentagon during the Reagan Administration and five years in the U.S. Senate, including the Professional Staff of the Senate Armed Services Committee under Chairman Strom Thurmond. From 1995 to 1998 he was director of defense and foreign policy at The Heritage Foundation.

His opinion columns and analytical articles have been published on a wide variety of national security issues. Before completing The Hunt for Confederate Gold he wrote a nonfiction narrative School for Genius: The Story of Switzerland’s Federal Technical Institute on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of this world-famous university.

He has begun work on There Lives the Moment, a story of the Battle of Gettysburg uniquely set in 1913 when 10,000 Union and Confederate survivors returned to the epic battlefield of their youth for a 50th anniversary commemorative encampment, where they confronted searing memories of triumph and loss.

Mr. Moore is a 1970 graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina; attended the University of Grenoble, France under a French Government Scholarship, and earned a master’s degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

The event is sponsored by the Fauquier County Public Library and the Fauquier Heritage Institute. Volunteers and lecturers are encouraged to contact program Co-chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson, (540) 341-7019, or Mrs. Jackie Lee, (540) 347-0607.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Borders customers donate books to library

Borders is facilitating a book donation drive for Fauquier County Public Library at its Warrenton store, located in the shopping center at Route 17 and West Lee Highway.

According to Store Manager Diane Fichthorn, Borders has already collected approximately 500 books for the library, primarily children’s titles, valued at more than $4,000. The donation drive continues through Monday, Sept. 14.

“The library is thrilled with the response to the Borders book donation drive,” says Library Director Maria Del Rosso. “Our book budget has been cut 25 percent from last year while library use has sky rocketed. The books we receive from the Borders program will go a long way in helping us keep Fauquier’s children reading.”

When Borders customers are paying for their purchases they can also choose a book, or books, to purchase for the library. To help customers pick out books to donate, staff at the store have a selection of books on hand that the library has expressed an interest in adding to its collection.

The store does two major book drives a year to benefit local charities. This is the first time Borders has designated the library to receive donations.

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Library cards open more than books

It's National Library Card Sign-up Month and new library card holders will join the ranks of the two-thirds of Americans who already have library cards.

New applicants will learn that library cards do more than open books these days. Having a library card has more benefits for children, teens, and adults than ever before. It opens the door to a world of information and much of it can be accessed from home using your library card number.
Many library materials now come in a variety of other formats, such as audio books, CDs, DVDs, e-books and downloadable audio books. Databases — which provide access to encylopedias and other reference resources and thousands of magazine and newspaper articles — are available 24/7 from your home or office computer with your library card number.

Library services are more comprehensive than ever before and include free use of public computers, adult Internet classes, book clubs, discussion groups, and special events for all ages.
Be sure to check out the the library's Web site, too. This virtual library puts a wealth of information at your fingertips 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Some features are targeted to special audiences, such as the special pages for parents, educators, children and teens.

Library cards are free for those who work or live in Fauquier County and the application only takes a few minutes to complete. To apply for a card, stop at any Fauquier library or complete a short online application.

Once you apply you can immediately use online resources and check out e-books, no matter what time of day you complete your application.

If you have questions, call or visit any of the Fauquier County public libraries.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Using a library card helps school performance

September is National Library Card Sign-up Month, so it is a perfect time to be reminded that studies show that children who use the library and who read, or are read to at home, perform better in school. They are also more likely to continue to use the library as a source for a satisfying lifetime of learning according the American Library Association (ALA).

There is no age requirement to register for a library card at Fauquier County Public Library, and many parents enjoy giving their children the thrill and responsibility of owning their own "charge card," one that lets them borrow books, movies, music, and more.

As an added incentive, children and teens who apply for a new library card and then show it to a staff member at the library reference desk this month will be given a prize.

Library cards are free for those who work or live in Fauquier County and the application only takes a few minutes to complete. To apply for a card, stop at any Fauquier library or complete an application online.

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Nominations open for librarian award

Nominations are being accepted for the 2009 Carnegie Corporation of New York/New York Times "I Love My Librarian Award."

The award invites library users to recognize the accomplishments of librarians in public, school, college, community college and university libraries for their efforts to improve the lives of people in their community. Nominations will run through October 9 and are being accepted online.

Up to 10 librarians will be selected. Each will receive a $5,000 cash award, a plaque and a $500 travel stipend to attend an awards ceremony and reception in New York, hosted by The New York Times in December. In addition, a plaque will be given to each award winner’s library.

Monday, August 24, 2009

Children and teens break reading record

The final count is in. This summer Fauquier children and teens smashed the record for the number of books read during the Fauquier County Public Library’s summer reading programs by more than 6,000 books.

The library’s goal was for children and teens participating in the summer reading programs to collectively read 27,000 books between June 1 and August 15. The 1,892 participants exceeded the goal by reading 33,482 books. Last year summer reading program participants read 25,725 books during the same period and in 2007 they read 16,699.

Congratulations Fauquier readers!

Monday, August 10, 2009

Amazon purchases help library

Now your purchases at Amazon.com can help Fauquier County public libraries - and it costs you nothing extra.
Planning to shop for books, movies, electronics, gifts, or anything else available at Amazon.com? If so, start by bookmarking this Amazon.com link as a favorite. By using this link, Amazon will donate about 6% of your purchases - half of which goes directly to the library - to Wowbrary, a service from Amazon that provides a weekly e-mail highlighting the library's latest additions of books, music and movies.

So, don't forget to start your online shopping by going to the library’s Wowbrary/Amazon.com page.

Also, be sure to sign up for the Wowbrary newsletter to see a sampling of the newest stuff at the library each week. From there, if you see something interesting you'd like to check out, you can link directly to the library catalog where you can reserve the new item and be notified when it's ready to be picked up at your library.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Historian portrays Francis Fauquier

Fauquier County Public Library and the Fauquier Heritage Institute are hosting a lecture on Francis Fauquier (1703 – 1768), a Lieutenant Governor of Virginia Colony, at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 16, at the John Barton Payne Building, Warrenton.

The lecture is being presented by “Living Historian” Dennis Loba. Francis Fauquier, a friend of Thomas Jefferson, served as Virginia's acting governor from 1758 until his death in 1768.

Mr. Loba, who has long been involved with reenactments nationally and locally, will present information about the lieutenant governor in authentic period clothing. During the Fauquier County’s 250th Anniversary Celebration parade, Mr. Loba introduced the honored guests, several members of the Fauquier family, to the parade audience.

Contact Fauquier Heritage Institute program Co-chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson, (540) 341-7019, or Mrs. Jackie Lee, (540) 347-0607, for more information or to volunteer.

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Deadline approaching for teen Creativity Gala submissions

Teens entering 6th grade or higher this fall are invited to read poetry, play music, sing, or perform stand-up comedy during a special celebration of teen creativity in August hosted by Fauquier County Public Library.

Artwork, videos, crafts and creative writing are also being accepted for exhibition at the Express Yourself Summer Creativity Gala. The deadline for performing or for submitting a creative work for exhibition is 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 7. The gala is planned for 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 14, at the John Barton Payne Building.

Submit artwork in person at any Fauquier library or by e-mail. Call or e-mail Anna Ellis, 439-9728, if you would like to perform at the event or for more information.

The gala is the final special event of the Express Yourself summer reading program for teens at Fauquier County public libraries. Express Yourself also features anime, gaming, and a series of creativity challenges, some of which can be the impetus for entries for the Summer Creativity Gala.

Teens are encouraged to register for the summer reading program and log the number of books read each week. The library’s goal is for children and teens to collectively read and log 27,000 books by Aug. 15.

Library helps with genealogy research

If you are doing or planning to do genealogical research, you will want to note two upcoming Fauquier County Public Library programs.

The first is a demonstration of one of the library’s free online services, Heritage Quest Online, at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, in the John Barton Payne Building. Registration is not required for the free demonstration. Reference Librarian Mary Sue Marsh will be on hand to answer questions.

If you are a beginning genealogist, or have gotten stuck doing your research, a genealogy one-on-one is definitely something you should sign up for. Individual sessions, beginning in September and continuing through November, are being scheduled now. The 45-minute sessions will be held between 1 to 2:30 p.m. on selected Tuesdays. Only 12 slots are available, so call (540) 347-8750, ext. 6, or e-mail Mary Sue Marsh soon to reserve a spot.

The Warrenton Library also hosts free genealogy research marathons each fall and spring. Librarians and experienced researchers are on hand throughout the marathons to help genealogists and would-be genealogists. Call (540) 347-8750, ext. 6, or e-mail Vicky Ginther for marathon details.

Monday, July 20, 2009

Special story time helps prepare kids for kindergarten

All Fauquier County public libraries are presenting a special story time for children entering kindergarten this fall that features stories, songs, and rhymes about school that will help children prepare for their first day of kindergarten. Children are invited to bring a lunch to eat after the program.

Registration is not required for this free program.

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Teens create collage art, hardware store jewelry

Teen creativity will continue to be challenged during two upcoming events at Fauquier libraries . The programs are part of a series being presented during the Express Yourself teen summer reading program for students entering sixth grade or higher this fall.

Teens are invited to join their friends to make funky, fun creations while playing the collage art game for creative minds “Glue, Paper, Scissors.” Laughs are guaranteed while participants create unexpected and completely collaborative works of art at the county’s libraries. Get the Collage Art with a Twist details.

Teens will learn how to create hardware store ‘bling’ from items commonly found around the house or in the garage during another special event. There is no need to take apart your kid sister’s bicycle though, the library will have all the nuts and bolts required to make the personalized jewelry. Get the Hardware Store Jewelry Workshop details.

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Relationship between Grant, Mosby discussed

Fauquier County Public Library is hosting an extended program of two free lectures on Union General Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate Colonial John Singleton Mosby beginning 2 p.m. Sun., July 19, at the John Barton Payne Building. The program is sponsored by the library and the Fauquier Heritage Institute.

The first lecture, The Post-War Relationship of Grant and Mosby, will be presented by David Goetz, who is co-authoring a book on The Life and Times of John Singleton Mosby.

Mr. Goetz, who owns Mosby's Confederacy Inc. and leads tours in the area, has long been interested in the post-war relationship between the two men who, he says, managed to put their emotions behind them to cooperate in a spirit of reconciliation.

Mr. Goetz is descended from the family of Chaplain Father James M. Graves, who served with Generals Joe Johnston and Stonewall Jackson in the Army of Virginia in 1861-62. He is a member of the Black Horse Camp #780, Sons of Confederate Veterans.

The second lecture is being presented by Eric Buckland, the author of Mosby’s Keydet Rangers. Mr. Buckland, who participates with the Mosby Players and is a member of the Gray Ghost Interpretive Group sponsored by the Mosby Heritage Area Association, will talk about Mosby’s Keydet Rangers, which is a compilation of information about the young men who both matriculated at the Virginia Military Institute and rode with the 43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry, also known as Mosby’s Rangers.

He will discuss the genesis of Mosby's Keydet Rangers to give lecture attendees new insight into the young men who rode with Col. Mosby during the Civil War. The book draws from short biographical sketches, personal letters, accounts of various raids and incidents, newspaper articles, and passages from books, memorials, and obituaries. The book contains much previously unpublished material.

The Fauquier Heritage Institute was created to promote the study and love of American history. Contact program Co-chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson, (540) 341-7019, or Mrs. Jackie Lee, (540) 347-0607, for more information or to volunteer.

Get a PDF of this year's series.

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Libraries host community quilting bees

A community quilting bee and story time is being hosted by all Fauquier libraries this summer, a great chance for families to “bee” creative.

The Fauquier County Quilters Guild will help families attending the program to design and color quilting squares. Guild members will then take the squares and make fabric blocks that will be incorporated into library quilts.

The community quilting bees are at 2 p.m.:
The quilting bees are part of a series of programs and special events presented during the Be Creative summer reading program for children through fifth grade and their families. The program also features story times, family movies, and events to pique children’s curiosity and inspire them to be creative and to explore new ideas through reading.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Senior get physically, mentally fit with Wii

Senior citizens are invited to learn to play virtual sports games at 2 p.m. every other Friday at the Warrenton Library, (540) 347-8750, ext. 6. Teen volunteers will be on hand to help participants learn how to bowl, ski, or play tennis in the virtual world.

Wii seems to be a great way to exercise and stay fit, especially for seniors, according to reports coming from community and senior centers, universities, and libraries. A recent British study, reports CNN.com, suggests that playing Wii games can help seniors improve balance and help avoid falls. The fun factor is making the rate of participation higher, and the device's entertainment value is increased because virtual gaming apparently not only improves physical fitness levels, but also hones cognitive skills.

Scientists at the University of Illinois have determined that computer and video games help keep the brains of the elderly sharp, and significantly, research indicates the positive effects of video gaming are both immediate and long lasting.

The library’s Wii gaming system was purchased by the Friends of the Fauquier Library, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting library programs and other needs. Call (540) 349-1253 for more details.

Sunday, June 21, 2009

Teens - Learn to set up your own digital recording studio

Teens will learn how to record and mix their own music at all Fauquier County public libraries on Tuesday, June 30. Musician and sound engineer Thomas MacGregor will demonstate how to set up a digital recording studio on a home computer and mix music like a professional.

The program is free, but space is limited, so register as soon as possible.

- 1 p.m., John Marshall Library, (540) 364-4910

- 4:30 p.m., John Barton Payne Building, Warrenton, (540) 347-8750, ext. 5

- 7 p.m., Bealeton Library, (540) 439-9728.

This event is part of the Express Yourself summer reading program, a series of free special events and programs for students entering sixth grade or higher this fall. Register for Express Yourself online or at any Fauquier County public library.

The library’s summer reading programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Fauquier Library and supported by D.C. United, Warrenton Burger King, Papa John’s Pizza, Chick-Fil-A, & Five Guys and the Marshall McDonalds.

Friday, June 19, 2009

Nationally recognized storyteller coming to your library

Jim Weiss, award-winning storyteller and recording artist, will captivate children and adults alike with his recounting of ancient folktales and myths and his telling original stories at all Fauquier County public libraries on Monday, June 29.

Mr. Weiss has been a storyteller for over 25 years and has performed in many notable venues, including the White House. His production company Greathall has produced more than 40 storytelling recordings, and he is the recipient of more than 80 major national awards. His recordings will be available for purchase after the program.

He is appearing at: 10:30 a.m., John Barton Payne Building, (540) 347-8750, ext. 5; 1 p.m., John Marshall Library, Marshall, (540) 364-4910; and 3 p.m., Bealeton Library, (540) 439-9728.

This event is part of the Be Creative summer reading program, a series of free special events and programs for children of all ages and their families. Register for Be Creative online or at any Fauquier library.

The library’s summer reading programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Fauquier Library and supported by D.C. United, Warrenton Burger King, Papa John’s Pizza, Chick-Fil-A, & Five Guys and the Marshall McDonalds.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Anime party a summer celebration

The Liberty High School Anime Club is hosting an anime party at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 15, at the Bealeton Library.

The gathering is an end-of-the-school-year party for its members and a beginning-of-summer celebration for other teens in the community. The group will screen Hayao Miyazaki’s Castle in the Sky and the club will provide Japanese snacks, music, and games. Cosplay is encouraged, but optional. All costumes should be “rated PG.” This free event is open to anyone in grade 6 or higher.

See more about anime events and Express Yourself programs at the library this summer. Check out anime and manga books and other items.

Friday, June 5, 2009

Apollo's legacy, lunar geology illuminated

Fauquier County Public Library will host a revealing 60-minute retrospective entitled On the Shoulders of Giants: Project Apollo to the Moon, presented by Gar Schulin at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 14, in the John Barton Payne Building. The free lecture is sponsored by the library and the Fauquier Heritage Institute.

Since the dawn of civilization, humans have gazed at the moon in awe and wonderment, perceiving rugged mountains, mysterious seas, sacred spirits and even humorous faces. Modern telescopes brought this alien world into sharper focus and study more than a century ago. In the 1960s and early 1970s, the United States won the Cold War race to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth. For a brief moment, the monumental effort took a futuristic, 21st Century event and placed it squarely in the middle of the 20th Century.

During Project Apollo these unseen vistas were brought to life during a series of spectacular expeditions by 24 bold American astronauts, and supported by more than 400,000 engineers, technicians and scientists from 1968 through 1972. The Apollo lunar missions led to many important discoveries while raising even more questions. It represented the best of American character, spirit and technological innovation, yet these thrilling expeditions were abruptly canceled even as the program achieved its greatest scientific advance - its remaining hardware already built and un-flown.

The retrospective lecture will include a discussion of the early engineering test flights and an overview of the later extended-stay landing expeditions. Accomplishments of each mission will be reviewed while insight into the geology objectives and findings for each of the landing sites will be highlighted. Additional first-hand accounts as related to the presenter by the Apollo veterans will also be included.

Lecture presenter Gar Schulin is a Warrenton resident and career Defense Department employee. While a research assistant to Dr. Farouk El-Baz, the distinguished Project Apollo geologist at the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, Schulin supported a team of senior geologists engaged in ongoing lunar and planetary research. He helped open the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in 1976 and was recognized for his contributions by past NASM director and Apollo 11 veteran Michael Collins in 1977 and 1978; and more recently by Museum Director General John R. Dailey.

Mr. Schulin is a former member of the Association of Scientists and Engineers of the Naval Sea Systems Command, past president of the Baltimore-Washington Society of Allied Weight Engineers, and a former Smithsonian research assistant and museum docent. His preservation and community service includes memberships in the Virginia Society Sons of the American Revolution, Culpeper Minute Men Chapter; the Virginia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans, Black Horse Camp #780; the Abbeville Institute; the Liberty Heritage Society; the Dwight D. Eisenhower Foundation; and the National Air and Space Society. His articles on historic topics have appeared in local and national newspapers, magazines and Internet publications.

The Fauquier Heritage Institute was created to promote the study and love of American history by presenting free lectures by experienced speakers and historians. Contact program Co-chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson, (540) 341-7019, or Mrs. Jackie Lee, (540) 347-0607, for more information or to volunteer.

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Summer reading helps kids keep skills

Research indicates that students experience significant learning losses during the summer months, but that children who read during the summer retain reading and learning skills better than those who don't. To curb learning loss, and to provide some fun activities, Fauquier County Public Library is presenting a series of free programs that will engage participants and encourage reading over the summer months.

Registration for the programs — Be Creative for children and Express Yourself for students entering sixth grade or higher — is underway now at all Fauquier libraries. Weekly programs and special events — many of which the whole family can enjoy — begin June 20 and continue through Aug. 15.

As an incentive, children and teens may log in the number of books they read each week online or at their library to earn a chance to spin a prize wheel. Registrants set their own personal reading goals based on the types of books they like to read and how many books they plan to complete by Aug. 15.

The library's goal is for participants to collectively read 27,000 books before the programs end. Prizes are awarded whenever books are logged into personal reading logs and participants may earn a chance for an additional prize wheel spin each week by completing fun activities.

There are reading suggestions for children and teens on all kinds of topics. The library also posts the summer reading lists of local area schools when available. Be sure to also check out http://kiddosphere.blogspot.com/ for book, CD and DVD reviews for parents and children and Library Lounging for teens.

Two other summer programs are notable this year. Letterboxing — a kind of treasure hunt involving the whole county — is continuing through the summer for all ages and has been fortified with new locations and clues. Letterboxing is a great family activity.

A Wii for Seniors series completes the full spectrum of summer programs at the library. Wii for Seniors will be hosted every other week beginning Friday, June 19. Teen volunteers will be on hand to teach seniors how to play tennis, bowl, or ski in a virtual environment.

The library’s summer reading programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Fauquier Library and supported by D.C. United, Warrenton Burger King, Papa John’s Pizza, Chick-Fil-A, & Five Guys and the Marshall McDonalds.

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Library demonstrating ancestry research tool

The library is presenting a free demonstration of Ancestry.com Library Edition at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 6, at the John Barton Payne Building. Registration is not required. E-mail or call (540) 347-8750, ext. 6, for more information.

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Teen summer volunteer application deadline extended

The application deadline for teen volunteers needed this summer at all Fauquier County public libraries has been extended to Saturday, May 30.

Teen volunteers are needed to help with the children’s summer reading program, which begins June 20 and continues through Aug. 15. Some of the tasks teen volunteers will perform include helping children and parents with summer reading program registration, keeping the registration table stocked, assisting children and parents with entering the number of books they have read into the online book log, and lending a hand with crafts and programs.

Many teens find volunteering at the library is a great way to gain work experience while fulfilling community service or service learning hours, a graduation requirement for many high schools. Others volunteer because they love reading and libraries and some volunteer simply because they enjoy helping others.

Summer volunteers must attend a training session prior to the start of the reading program, so applicants will be called to schedule the training.

Monday, May 11, 2009

Role of Fauquier militia during War of 1812 discussed

The library is hosting a free lecture entitled The War of 1812 in Virginia, and the role of the Fauquier County militia presented by author Mike Lyman at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 17, in the John Barton Payne Building.

Mr. Lyman, co-author of the publication Encounters with British in Virginia During the War of 1812, is a “living” historian and member of the Virginia Society Sons of the American Revolution, Culpeper Minute Men Chapter; and the War of the 1812 Society. He also compiles information on Virginia burials of American founders before May of 1657, Revolutionary War patriots, and War of 1812 veterans.

He is a member of the Stafford County Historical Society and the Mary Ball Museum Library, and is a former or a current member of The Order of Americans of Armorial Ancestry, The Society of Colonial Wars, The Society of Mayflower Descendants, The Society of the Sons & Daughters of the Pilgrims, The Society of Descendants of Colonial Clergy, and The Sons of Union Veterans.

The lecture is part of a series of lectures on historical topics sponsored by the library and the Fauquier Heritage Institute to be presented this year. The Fauquier Heritage Institute was created to promote the study and love of American history and present free lectures by experienced speakers and historians. Contact program Co-chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson, (540) 341-7019, or Mrs. Jackie Lee, (540) 347-0607, for more information or to volunteer.

Thursday, May 7, 2009

Family research marathon tomorrow!

Tomorrow is the last day to register for Fauquier County Public Library's free family research marathon being held from 6 to 10 p.m. (Friday, May 8) at the Warrenton Library. Advance registration is required, and at the time this was posted there were only a few spots left. Call (540) 347-8750, ext. 6 or e-mail now to register. Light refreshments will be provided by the Friends of the Fauquier Library.

See what the library has to offer on local history and genealogical research.

Monday, May 4, 2009

Proposal writing basics slated

The library is hosting an introductory Proposal Writing Basics course at 7 p.m. Monday, May 11, at the Bealeton Library. Patricia Pasqual, Director of the Foundation Center of New York’s Washington, DC office, is presenting the course.

The Foundation Center, established in 1956, is the nation's leading authority on philanthropy. It maintains the most comprehensive database available on U.S. grant makers and their grants and is supported by nearly 600 foundations. Details on grant providers and information on how to apply for grants are notable features of the new collection.
The Bealeton Library, which was chosen to house a Foundation Center cooperating collection last year.

Learn about the basics of writing a proposal for nonprofit organizations then stay afterward to use the cooperating collection.

The program is free, but registration is required. Contact Bealeton Branch Manager Natalie Swart to reserve your spot or if you have questions.

Wii Sports tennis tourny for kids

Students in in grades 3-5 are invited to try their best moves during a Wii Sports virtual tennis match from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 16, at the Bealeton Library.

Studies have proven that gaming and literacy go hand-in-hand. American Library Association President Jim Rettig says, "Games of every type play an important role in developing fundamental competencies for life. They require players to learn and follow complex sets of rules, make strategic and tactical decisions, and, increasingly, collaborate with teammates and others: all things they will have to do in college and in the workforce."

For these reasons gaming is becoming increasingly popular in the nation's public, school and academic libraries. The Friends of the Fauquier Library recently donated a Wii console, several games, and controllers to the library. Several Wii programs, including a bowling night for seniors, have already been presented at the library and more are being planned.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Civil War armament shown, hands-on exhibit

Roy and Dallas Kennedy are bringing their collection of Civil War weapons, including a miniature cannon, to the Bealeton Library at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 25.

The Kennedys, who will appear in period dress, will talk about the design, use and maintenance of Civil War armaments and allow those attending to examine the pieces closely. The couple is dedicated to preserving our area’s extraordinary history through first person interpretations and vignettes of the poignant days during The War Between the States.

Both are members of North-South Skirmish Association, which encourages the preservation and display of Civil War materials and promotes the shooting of Civil War firearms and artillery. They are also members of the Mosby Players, a group of “living” historians that live in and around the Mosby Heritage Area.

The program is free. Call (540) 439-9728 for more information.

Friday, April 10, 2009

Volunteers honored, teen volunteers needed

Fauquier County Public Library volunteers, who generously offer their time and talents to enrich and expand library services, will be honored at a reception sponsored by the Friends of the Fauquier Library this month. The volunteers, who serve at all Fauquier libraries in a variety of capacities, will be saluted by library staff during the reception.

More than 200 volunteers of all ages donated nearly 4,100 hours doing a variety of tasks at Fauquier’s libraries last year. Library volunteers must be 13 or older and are asked to commit to six months of volunteering. Applications are available at all library locations or online. Call Lynn Hawkins, (540) 349-1820 for information on these and other volunteer opportunities.

Currently the Friends of the Fauquier Library also need volunteers who are 18 or older to work at The Book Cellar, a used book store featuring bargain basement prices.

Teen volunteers are needed to help with the children’s summer reading program, which begins June 20 and continues through Aug. 15. Some of the tasks teen volunteers will perform include assisting children and parents with summer reading program registration, keeping the registration table stocked and neat, assisting children and parents with entering the number of books they have read into the online book log, and helping with crafts and programs.

Many teens find volunteering at the library is a great way to gain work experience while fulfilling community service or service learning hours, a graduation requirement for many high schools. Others volunteer because they love reading and libraries or because they enjoy helping others.

Teen volunteer applications, available at all Fauquier libraries and online beginning April 13, will be accepted through May 16.

Did anyone really know what time it was?

How time was kept and regulated in the years before 1883, and especially during the turbulent Civil War years, was chaotic. Time balls, Noon Marks, and the widespread use of almanacs helped 19th century Americans determine what time it was in their locality. But when one traveled confusion reigned, often with tragic results.

Historian Arthur Candenquist is presenting a program at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 19, in the John Barton Payne Building that examines the importance of almanacs and time signals to 19th century life, how time was kept and regulated, and how the absence of standard time led to disastrous train wrecks. The free program is sponsored by the Fauquier Heritage Institute and Fauquier County Public Library.

Mr. Candenquist will explain how time was regulated by the armies from 1861 to 1865 and will discuss the possibility that non-synchronized watches may have played a role in their lack of success on the battlefield.

We take time standardization for granted now, but less than 100 years ago there was no standard of time, so examining life in the 19th century might make us stop to wonder: Did anyone really know what time it was?

Mr. Candenquist has been a serious scholar of the War Between the States since 1956 and focuses his attention on the more unusual and lesser-known aspects of the war. He has lectured extensively on wartime railroads, the role of Masons during the war, the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid on Richmond, and the war in Virginia.

The Fauquier Heritage Institute was created to promote the study and love of Virginia and American history. To that end, the Institute hosts public lectures that seek to provide knowledge, understanding and appreciation of our local, regional and national history.

The institute welcomes volunteers to serve in a variety of capacities. Contact Program Co-Chairs Mrs. Paula Johnson at (540) 341-7019; or Mrs. Jackie Lee at (540) 347-0607, for more information.

Thursday, April 9, 2009

Worlds connect at the library


April 12-18 is National Library Week, a time to celebrate the contributions of libraries and library staff - and a perfect time to discover how “worlds connect @ your library.” First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April.

Fauquier County Public Library is celebrating National Library Week at all of its branches and has expanded its observance to include events and programs throughout the month. Offerings include stories, crafts and science experiments for children; free-play Wii days for children and teens and Wii sports for seniors; book art and poetry slams for teens; and history lectures, Internet classes, and genealogy research one-on-one sessions for adults.

“Every day libraries help make a difference in their communities,” says Library Director Maria Del Rosso. “At our library, we see people using library computers and the library’s Wi-Fi access to find jobs and learn new skills, and we see them borrowing books, magazines and DVDs to tackle how-to projects at home and to learn new ways to improve their health.”

Library services remain free to every citizen, providing equal opportunity for people of all ages and backgrounds, Mrs. Del Rosso points out, and more than half of Fauquier County residents have a library card. The library provides resources and programs that seek to inform, educate, enrich, and entertain every member of our community, she adds.

“Our trained professionals help students do better in school by helping them with research projects and pointing them in the right direction to complete homework assignments,” she says, “and we light up the imaginations of our youngest patrons with story times and live theater programs. I firmly believe there is something for everyone at the library.”

Once you have your card, you can go to the library's Web site, create your personal account, and begin taking advantage of the special features mentioned above, all for free.

Friday, March 27, 2009

Transportation played pivotal role during Civil War

Key transportation roles, issues and advances of the mid-19th Century and how they affected the epoch struggle of the War between the States are the topics of an upcoming symposium sponsored by the Fauquier Heritage Institute and Fauquier County Public Library.

The free symposium, being presented by a panel of noted local historians, begins at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 4, in the John Barton Payne Building, and will conclude around 5 p.m. Seating is limited to 100. Call (540) 341-7019 for more information.

Transportation issues and new technology played a pivotal role during the war, the bloodiest conflict of the 19th Century. The presenters will illustrate how each of these areas impacted the War on both sides.

Mr. Arthur Candenquist is speaking on the topic If We Build It, Supplies Will Come, or, The Confederates Construct The World's First Military Railroad. His talk, which includes both narration and slides, examines the events that led up to the construction of what was to be the first railroad in history built exclusively for military purposes. He is also speaking on the principle personalities in this endeavor, and how the race against time was won by a mere six weeks. Mr. Candenquist has been a serious scholar of the War Between the States since 1956, and focuses his attention on the more unusual and lesser-known aspects of the War. He has lectured extensively on wartime railroads, the role of Masons during the war, the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid on Richmond, and the war in Virginia.

Mr. Ronald Beavers is speaking on The O & A and the U.S. Military Railroad (USMRR) in the Civil War. The Orange and Alexandria (O&A) Railroad was built to encourage passenger travel and to reduce shipping costs for the piedmont farmers. The railroad was completed to Warrenton by November 1852, joined with the Virginia Central (VC) Railroad in Gordonsville by 1854 and extended to Lynchburg by 1860. Because of the direct rail route from Alexandria to Richmond, it was arguably the most fought over railroad in Virginia. The shops and facilities at its northern terminus in Alexandria fell under Union control in May 1861 and were greatly expanded after the United States Military Railroad (USMRR) was established in January 1862. The activities of the USMRR using these facilities not only greatly enhanced the Union war effort and but were also crucial to the Union's successful prosecution of the Civil War. Mr. Beavers has been a docent at the Fairfax Station Railroad Museum since 1996 and a Museum Board Director since 1998. He is also active in preservation efforts and is a member of the Civil War Preservation Trust, the Friends of Fort Ward, the Friends of Gettysburg National Park, the Friends of Fairfax Station Railroad Museum, the John S. Mosby Foundation, the Montpelier Foundation, Friend of the Mt. Vernon Ladies Association, the Bull Run Civil War Roundtable, Company D of the 17th Virginia Infantry Regiment, and the Victorian Society of Falls Church.

Mr. Terry Treat is speaking on The Role of the Horse in the Civil War. He’ll address the many tasks performed by the horse in support of the war effort: how they were acquired, trained, cared for, and died by the thousands in service to their masters. Mr. Treat commands the Black Horse Troop, also known as Company H, 4th Virginia Cavalry, which is a reenactment and living history organization today. The club seeks to portray the Confederate cavalry trooper and how they lived, drilled and fought on horseback. The Black Horse was originally organized in Warrenton in 1859 as the Warrenton Mounted Militia.

Mr. James G. Flanagan is speaking on The Rappahannock Canal - From Fredericksburg to Waterloo. His talk includes a Power Point presentation showing the remains of several locks, canal walls and dams in Fauquier County. The history of the canal, its failure and demise at the hand of the growing Orange & Alexander Railroad and the reason for its failure and its costs with receipt copies will be featured. Mr. Flanagan speaks to historical groups throughout Virginia and the metropolitan D.C. area and is currently writing a book on the March 17, 1863, Battle of Kelly’s Ford. He is the education coordinator of the Liberty Heritage Society, Warrenton, Va., and coordinates the docents and educational events for The Liberty Heritage Society in Warrenton. He is a past vice president of the Brandy Station Foundation and president and founder of the Fauquier County Civil War Roundtable.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Library joins the county's 250th anniversary celebration







Fauquier County Public Library is joining in the county's 250th anniversary celebration.

Cake-making items being collected
Throughout April all Fauquier County Public Library branches are collecting cake mixes, cans of prepared frosting, and birthday cake candles. In May, birthday cake kits will be assembled at Fauquier libraries as part of the county’s 250th anniversary celebration. The birthday cake kits will be donated to the Fauquier Food Distribution Coalition to be distributed to those in need. So, drop off birthday cake supplies to your favorite library branch (Warrenton, Bealeton or John Marshall), then join us in May (see below) to help us assemble the kits — we’ll party while we work!

Birthday Cake Kit Assembly
Individuals and families are invited to help assemble birthday cake kits on Friday, May 1, to be donated to the Fauquier Food Distribution Coalition as part of the County’s 250th anniversary celebration. Enjoy a party while you work!

Virginiana Room Open House
Everyone is invited to visit the Virginiana Room, housed in the Warrenton Library, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, May 1, as part of the county's 250th anniversary celebration.
The Virginiana Room, which has an extensive collection of materials focusing on state and local history and genealogical research. Library staff members will be available to give people a tour of the room, highlighting resources on Fauquier County history, genealogy, and the Civil War.